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Art Johnson
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posted 29 June 2021 09:42      Profile for Art Johnson   Email Art Johnson   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Five Bob worth? Wow when I was a kid it was only tupence.
Posts: 31 | From: Scarborough ON Canada | Registered: Jun 2000  |  IP: Logged
Soldier of Fortune
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posted 29 June 2021 16:52      Profile for Soldier of Fortune   Email Soldier of Fortune   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
what? can you re-phrase that?


[Canadian] [Bullet] Soldier of Fortune [Bullet] [Canadian]


Posts: 119 | From: Tottenham, Ontario | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged
the patriot
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posted 29 June 2021 19:18      Profile for the patriot   Author's Homepage   Email the patriot   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
HUH?!!!!!

-the patriot- [Canadian]


Posts: 301 | From: The Great White North | Registered: Jun 2000  |  IP: Logged
Art Johnson
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posted 01 July 2021 12:33      Profile for Art Johnson   Email Art Johnson   Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
My reference was to Gordon Angus Mackinley's remark of giving his "five bob worth". It used to be that people gave their two cents or tupence worth when commenting on a suject. I guess it was an attempt at humour that fell flat plus a bit of fingeritis.

[ 01 July 2001: Message edited by: Art Johnson ]


Posts: 31 | From: Scarborough ON Canada | Registered: Jun 2000  |  IP: Logged
Briar
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posted 02 July 2021 00:27      Profile for Briar     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
As for the US Army, they pretty much have gone to a "regimental system". And as for naming the divisions, brigades, and regiments after famous generals: well thats news to me. I don't recall a General Blackhorse or Col. Bloody Bucket anywhere in US history. The US has found that regiments have proven to be extremely versatile and as self- sufficient units, can be "plugged in" as needed. If a division needs more artillery, a brigade can be added on with no real effect on organization. And since it is self-sufficient, it will not burden the existing organization. One error is that when a man joins the army, he does just that: joins the ARMY. Most of the time he will not have a say in where or what unit he will be placed. An esprit-di-corps is then established from that unit. Unlike joining a regiment where the traditions are already in play. This can help or hinder an army. It fosters tradition, pride, and an esprit-di-corps, but can hurt it as well. (During WW1, one regiment was able to muster over 50 battalions, while others were hard pressed for 3.) I also met a WW2 vet that had tried to enlist in PPCLI in 1937. He passed all the testing, but was not accepted due to his height. (Regimental orders wanted men 6' and over.) So he went on to join the Winnipeg Rifles and served gallantly in NW Europe. Many US National Guard units are looked down upon by regular army, but many of them are filled to over capacity. That should tell the brass hats to pay attention and to take notes. I wish the US Army would also look at Canadian Reserves and the UK Territorials. There are lessons to be learned from them as well.
Posts: 4 | From: SE United States | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged

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