Post New Topic  
my profile | register | search | faq | forum home
    next newest topic
»  The War Diary   » General Discussions   » Military History   » Canadian SAS

UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Canadian SAS
Argyll 2347

Member # 0

Rate Member

posted 05 January 2021 01:07     Profile for Argyll 2347   Email Argyll 2347     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
What ever happend to them?
Posts: | From: | Registered: A Long Time Ago!
Bill Alexander
Veteran Member
Member # 10

Rate Member

posted 05 January 2021 15:19     Profile for Bill Alexander   Email Bill Alexander     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Please clarify S A S? As far as I am aware Canada never had the equivalent of the British S A S.
Posts: 23 | From: North Bay Ont. | Registered: Jul 2000
Argyll 2347

Member # 0

Rate Member

posted 05 January 2021 16:54     Profile for Argyll 2347   Email Argyll 2347     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
According to a book about the history of the Canadian Airborne Regiment, there was a Canadian SAS. It was equivilent to the British SAS.
Posts: | From: | Registered: A Long Time Ago!
RCA
Veteran Member
Member # 74

Member Rated:

posted 05 January 2021 18:41     Profile for RCA     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
I think what you are thinking of is the SSF (or 1st Special Service Force)

It was combined Candian/American force raised during WWII and fought in Italy and Southern France before being disbanded. ( the movie "Devils Brigade" is based on the SSF.

If I'm not mistaken the SSF's motto was Who Dares Wins and thier emblem was the Winged Dagger both perpetuated by the Airborne Regiment


Posts: 140 | From: Army of the West | Registered: Aug 2000
Michael Dorosh
Veteran Member
Member # 63

Member Rated:

posted 05 January 2021 19:46     Profile for Michael Dorosh   Author's Homepage   Email Michael Dorosh     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
There was also a second incarnation of the SSF, in recent years, though only Canadians belonged to it.

The MSF (Mobile Striking Force) was formed just before the Korean War and was Canada's first full time, peace time, regular army unit that was fully para qualified.


Posts: 135 | From: Calgary, Alberta | Registered: Aug 2000
Argyll 2347

Member # 0

Rate Member

posted 08 January 2021 16:34     Profile for Argyll 2347   Email Argyll 2347     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
I am fully aware of all those units. The book clearly stated the "Canadian SAS".


Posts: | From: | Registered: A Long Time Ago!
Honi soit qui mal y pense
Veteran Member
Member # 42

Rate Member

posted 08 January 2021 23:04     Profile for Honi soit qui mal y pense   Email Honi soit qui mal y pense     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
I hope it's okay that I was never in Army Cadets either.

There has never been a Canadian SAS. There are SAS regiments in New Zealand/Australia, there used to be one in Rhodesia (now called Zimbabwe), but one was never formed in Canada.

The Special Service force adopted the winged dagger of the SAS as one of their insignia, which might have been what they meant in the book. The current 2nd Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group uses the arrowhead which harks back to the 1st Special Service Force.

The book must have been mistaken. In fact, there has never been an SAS-style unit in Canada. The Canadian Airborne Regiment was formed with the intention of providing a high level of training and skills to the Royal Canadian Infantry Corps as a whole, as troopers were to have been rotated back to their home units. Furthermore, each Commando was originally supposed to have three companies, and to be able to fight semi-independently from the other two. Going back even further, the origins of airborne capability in Canada were with the Mobile Striking Force, which would have reacted rapidly to any Soviet attempt to establish an airfield in Northern Canada.

The long and short of it is that Canada has never needed an SAS-style force, and (even though I hate to bring this up) JTF2 is a counterterrorism force, not meant for traditional special forces style missions. Even though they could no doubt adapt, from what we know they do not have this mandate. The British SAS existed mostly in this capacity until the Falkland Islands.

I think you need to realize that not everything you read in books is the truth, and that alot of "military" books are put together rather quickly, without alot of research, in other countries (ie. Great Britain or the US) which don't really care if they get their facts right about Canada.


Civitas et Princeps Cura Nostra


Posts: 5 | From: | Registered: Jan 2001
2 Charlie
Veteran Member
Member # 157

Member Rated:

posted 10 January 2021 02:38     Profile for 2 Charlie     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Ah, yes, more barrack room rumour. Had a friend who knew a friend and he, well you know...

No, to get with it, the closest we (Canada) came to the SAS was (I defy you to find any official record) to have select individuals serve with the Ossie SAS in Vietnam. There was a great fear that one might go missing and end up in some Hilton somewhere and well, you can guess the rest. As it turned out, all were accounted for at coffee, and we sent observers over after the fall to oversee unification. All in all, not a bad time they say, pitty.


Posts: 61 | From: | Registered: Jan 2001
fusilier
Veteran Member
Member # 115

Member Rated:

posted 12 January 2021 01:41     Profile for fusilier   Email fusilier     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Since World War II paratrooping skills have been preserved in Canada through the formation of such organizations as: The Canadian Special Air Service (SAS) Company, The Mobile Striking Force, The Defence of Canada Force, and currently the Canadian Airborne Regiment. The Canadian Special Air Service Company was formed in 1947 but was subsequently disbanded in 1949 after the Mobile Striking Force had been established in 1948. The MSF was an airborne brigade which was made up of various battalions from different units across Canada.

Fideliter


Posts: 35 | From: | Registered: Dec 2000
fusilier
Veteran Member
Member # 115

Member Rated:

posted 12 January 2021 01:54     Profile for fusilier   Email fusilier     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Gentlemen
I happened upon this little tidbit while researching at the Cambridge Military Library in Halifax. It is NOT fiction, and I have verified it with several different sources. Perhaps some of you should do some more research before coming on and telling the young cadet he's wrong. I know we don't like to think that cadet s know more than we do, but in this case it is true.
He deserves a little credit for sticking to his gun and in my opinion he will make a fine soldier some day

Fideliter


Posts: 35 | From: | Registered: Dec 2000
Argyll 2347

Member # 0

Rate Member

posted 12 January 2021 17:40     Profile for Argyll 2347   Email Argyll 2347     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Why thank you fusilier. Lots of officers and fellow NCOs tell me that I will an excellent soldier too.

Albainn Gu-Brath


Posts: | From: | Registered: A Long Time Ago!
2 Charlie
Veteran Member
Member # 157

Member Rated:

posted 13 January 2021 23:32     Profile for 2 Charlie     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
I stand corrected, good show.

For a short time after the war, the army had no parachute capability. Then, in 1946, parachuting skills were revived by the formation of a Canadian Special Air Service Company (SAS). In 1948, an airborne brigade group was established. Called the Mobile Striking Force, its assigned task was Canadian defence, particularly in the north. It consisted, in part, of battalions from The Royal Canadian Regiment, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, and the Royal 22e Regiment. In 1958, the Mobile Striking Force was reduced in size to one infantry company group from each infantry regiment and renamed the Defence of Canada Force.

Amazing what never made it into the Opie Dopie History Exam.


Posts: 61 | From: | Registered: Jan 2001
Doug
Veteran Member
Member # 27

Member Rated:

posted 17 January 2021 23:25     Profile for Doug     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
A Brief Overview of Canadian Special Operations and Airborne Forces: Includes Canadian SAS, First Special Service Force "Devil's Brigade", and the Airborne Regiment.

Today's Canadian paratroopers can trace their roots back to two highly distinguished units: the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion and the First Special Service Force.

The 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion was established on July 1st, 1942 with a Battalion headquarter, headquarters company, three rifle companies, and a total strength of 26 officers and 590 other ranks. Initially designated as a Home Guard Unit, the Battalion trained in Fort Benning, Georgia and then, at the newly established Parachute Training Center in Shilo, Manitoba. The unit was redesignated for active services and in July 1943 it left Canada for the United Kingdom where it joined the 6th British Airborne Division.

The Battalion's service in the European theatre included the Airborne invasion on D-Day, a short reinforcement stint in Belgium and Holland, the Airborne crossing of the Rhine and the subsequent advance to Wismar where they met the Russians. Its battle honors include: Normandy Landing, Dives Crossing, The Rhine and Northwest Europe 1944 - 45.

In June 1945 the Battalion returned to Canada, where, as it was the first unit to do so, it was greeted with a special "Welcome Home". The unit was disbanded in the next months at Niagara-on-the-Lake.

The first Special Service Force began its history on July 10th, 1942 as a joint Canadian-United States formation for special operations in Europe. This unit later became known as the "Devil's Brigade". Joint training was carried out in Helena, Montana prior to being sent into action. The First Special Service Force was initially deployed in the Aleutian Islands in the summer of 1943. In November of that year it was deployed to Italy where it distinguished itself in the successful assault on Monte LaDifensa and Monte Remetanea. During its tour in Italy, the force saw action at Anzio and was the first allied unit to enter Rome. It was subsequently deployed to Europe where it saw the remainder of its action. On December 5th, 1944 the Force was disbanded near Menton, France. It had received the following battle honors: Monte Camino, Monte La Difensa, Monte La Remetanea, Monte Majo, Anzio, Rome, Advance to the Tiber, Italy 1943-44, Southern France and Northwest Europe.

Since World War II paratrooping skills have been preserved in Canada through the formation of such organizations as: The Canadian Special Air Service (SAS) Company, The Mobile Striking Force, The Defence of Canada Force, and currently the Canadian Airborne Regiment. The Canadian Special Air Service Company was formed in 1947 but was subsequently disbanded in 1949 after the Mobile Striking Force had been established in 1948. The MSF was an airborne brigade which was made up of various battalions from different units across Canada. This brigade was stationed at widely divergent locations in Canada, and it carried out continuation parachute training and arctic warfare until 1958 at which time the size of the force was reduced. Thereafter only companies of parachutists trained within the various battalions. This smaller unit was called the Defence of Canada Force.

On April 8th, 1968 the charter for the formation of The Canadian Airborne Regiment was signed and the Regiment itself was formed in Edmonton. Initially organized as two infantry commandos, one artillery battery, one engineer field squadron, one signal squadron, and a service company, the Airborne Regiment was manned entirely by volunteers who were active paratroopers. Parachute instruction support was provided by the Canadian Airborne Center, while the Canadian Forces Parachute Maintenance Depot provided technical support. Both of these units are located in Edmonton.

On June 28th, 1970 a mechanized infantry battalion was added to the Regiment and was named 3 Canadian Mechanized Commando. This unit was an element of the 4th Canadian Mechanized Brigade and was stationed in CFB Baden, Germany. Although it was part of the Regiment it did not have a parachute role. In 1977, 3 Mechanized Commando disappeared from the order of battle and was renamed the 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment.

In April 1977, the Special Service Force was formed in Petawawa by the amalgamation of units from 2 Combat Group and the Canadian Airborne Regiment. This formation was created in order to provide a small general purpose force in central Canada which could quickly be inserted in any national or international theatre of operations.

This amalgamation transformed the Airborne Regiment into a mini-formation within the Special Service Force. The Airborne Regiment became the core to which other elements could be added to form the Airborne Battle Group. As a result of this transformation, The Canadian Airborne Regiment underwent a major reorganization in July 1977. The 1st Airborne Field Battery was disbanded and its role was assumed by E Battery (Para) 2nd Regiment Royal Canadian Horse Artillery. The 1st Airborne Field Squadron was also disbanded and its role was assumed by the Airborne Troop of 2nd Combat Engineer Regiment. An Airborne Evacuation Platoon and an Airborne Treatment Platoon were formed within 2 Field Ambulance and are attached to the Regiment when the complete Airborne Battle Group is deployed.

After being in Petawawa for one year, in June 1978, the Regiment underwent another reorganization. The two existing airborne commandos were reduced in size and a third, 3 Airborne Commando, was formed.

At that point the Canadian Airborne Regiment was composed of five separate units. The infantry element was composed of three airborne rifle commandos, combat service support was provided
by the Airborne Service Commando and to exercise command and control, the Regiment had an Airborne Headquarters and Signal Squadron. The total strength of the Regiment in peace time was approximately 750 all ranks.

Effective 24 June 1992, the Regiment experienced another reorganization which involved the transition to battalion size and organization. This organization incorporates five individual sub-units. The sub-units composition and tasks remain actively unchanged except the Airborne Regiment Signals Squadron has become the Airborne Headquarters Commando, which incorporates a Signals platoon.

The primary role of The Canadian Airborne Regiment is to provide a quick reaction force in support of national security, North American defense and international peace keeping. In addition to these roles, the Regiment must prepare for limited and general war in conjunction with other forces.

The Regiment is prepared for any task which may include deploying elements to specific areas of Canada as a deterrent force, or destroying enemy lodgments and/or recapturing vital points. It may also be required to act as a spearhead, deploying elements to seize or to construct an airfield for subsequent airlanding of large conventional forces. The Canadian Airborne Regiment is also required to be ready to deploy overseas for international peacekeeping duties.

The Canadian Airborne Regiment is Canada's strategic reserve force and as such is capable of rapid reaction. It is able to fulfill its many roles efficiently and professionally due to the high quality of both the training and soldiers in THE CANADIAN AIRBORNE
REGIMENT.


Posts: 47 | From: Bosnia | Registered: Jun 2000
noneck
FNG
Member # 219

Rate Member

posted 10 March 2021 05:40     Profile for noneck   Email noneck     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Fusilier was 100% right with his answer. If you don't know don't flap your gums. The young lad who asked the question had his facts straight as well. CABAR FEIDH.
Posts: 12 | From: Vancouver | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged

All times are ET  

Post New Topic   Close Topic    Move Topic      next newest topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | CdnArmy.ca | Privacy Statement

2001 CdnArmy.ca. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by Infopop Corporation
Ultimate Bulletin BoardTM 6.1.0.beta-0.1