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tryingtojoin
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posted 04 May 2021 18:39     Profile for tryingtojoin   Email tryingtojoin     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
If anyone has the time, I'd like to know what i'm in for at engineering school; What is the day to day routine? is it true what i read here; that you can get the equivelent of a university degree through the engineer training?
Posts: 12 | From: richmond | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
the patriot
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posted 06 May 2021 19:24     Profile for the patriot   Author's Homepage   Email the patriot     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
The only way you'll get an engineering degree is if you go to one of the military colleges (CMR or RMC) and specialize in one of the fields of study such as Mechanical, Civil, or Electrical Engineering. Your Combat Engineer trade training would take place in Phase 3 and Phase 4 of your officer training program. Now prior to admittance at one of the military colleges, you will have to successfully complete your Basic Officer Training which is Phase 1 of ROTP. The whole process takes about 4 years to complete.

-the patriot-


Posts: 200 | From: The Great White North | Registered: Jun 2000  |  IP: Logged
Soldier of Fortune
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posted 06 May 2021 20:14     Profile for Soldier of Fortune   Email Soldier of Fortune     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Iv'e been doing quite a bit of research about the Engineers and I have not been able to find anything about becoming a Field Engineer Officer. I know about :Civl, Electrical,and Machanical but what about Field. I guess Civil and Field are pretty close...

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Soldier of Fortune


Posts: 46 | From: Toronto, Ontario | Registered: Mar 2001  |  IP: Logged
ender
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posted 07 May 2021 13:27     Profile for ender   Email ender     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Field Engineer and civilian engineer (ie, civil, mechanical or whatever) are two entirely different things. Our use of the word is as old, but very different. Field Engineers are also referred to as Combat Engineers, the second term is perhaps more descriptive.

Our officers hold some kind of Engineering degree, but it's still fairly peripheral. Engineers are required to know math and stuff, and physics is good for bridge building but it is still an entirly different trade.

As Patriot said, the only way you get an engineering degree through the Army is going to RMC. The actual soldiering stuff is done in the summer.

On becoming a Field Engineer Officer. First, a word about becoming an officer. It's really a good idea to be an NCO and a private first. That way you can learn about how the Army works from a Private's perspective before you start having to bear a lot of reponsibility. Especially if you are really young it's good to gain some maturity. For instance, I was thinking about being an officer but decided to do my basic first, I've now decided that I would like to have a lot more experince before I get a commision. (if I ever do) That said, to be an Engineering officer you need to be enrolled in, or a graduate of a university engineer program. (sometimes they accept Physics but not usually) You also have to pass the intellegence test, which is harder for officers, and pass a rigorious interview. The you go off an do you pre-phase and phase courses.

TryingtoJoin,
I did a reserve engineer course so it's quite a bit different. We have a six week course as opposed to a six month course, so it's really frantic and sleepless and physically really demanding. But here's my basic day.

We slept in tents and would wake up at quater to 5 in the morning and get ready for inspection. Physical training was at 5:30 with the course officer. Sometimes it would consist of running for half an hour (in formation, you have to keep up with the officer) or of log P.T. which involves carrying logs over your head and stuff. After P.T. was inspection, which consited of us getting yelled at and doing pushups and stuff. We did insane numbers of pushups. To go to the bathroom you had to do 50 pushups and 5 chinups. Eventually you don't even notice and start doing pushups for fun. We would march down to breakfast, have about 3 minutes to eat and then we would march off somewhere else. We were on the move all day, doing someting. Somtimes we'd get lessons in classrooms on explosives or whatever, but mostly we did hands on stuff. The lessons were pretty much spent trying to stay awake. (not that they were boring, just that we were really tired) Eventaully we would get back to the tent lines at arount 6 (most days) and then we would usually get in trouble for whatever we screwed up during the day. This involves extra inspections, show parade, whatnot. After you finally got out you would have a shower, study, and get ready for the next day. You'd end up getting to sleep around 11 or 12 PM. Plus you would have a 2 hour fire picket that night. So basicaly your days were spent in a sleep deprived haze. My QL3 course was definatly the hardest thing I've ever done in my life, no questions asked. You really earn your cap badge, but there is a huge feeling of accomplishment when you do. You feel like you can do anything now.

Reg force courses arn't generally as bad, you actually get off at reasonable times and maybe get some sleep. (although all soldiers learn the real meaning of tired)

WARNING: bridging is incredibly physically demanding. The bridge pieces are really heavy, and you end up lifting them all day. You are expected to life more than 100 pounds. Upper body strength is very very important to an Engineer.

Anyway, hope I helped.


Posts: 105 | From: toronto | Registered: Feb 2001  |  IP: Logged
tryingtojoin
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posted 11 May 2021 02:03     Profile for tryingtojoin   Email tryingtojoin     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
thanks for the info, i appreciate it
Posts: 12 | From: richmond | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
the patriot
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posted 11 May 2021 11:50     Profile for the patriot   Author's Homepage   Email the patriot     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Better yet. For a more precise description of what a Combat Engineer does, refer to the Official Canadian Forces Recruiting Site linked under "Canadian Military Related". I find that there is a lot of information listed there and as well take a browse of the sites listed under "User Submitted Links". You'll get a better grasp of the military as a whole.

-the patriot-


Posts: 200 | From: The Great White North | Registered: Jun 2000  |  IP: Logged
McG
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posted 15 May 2021 22:06     Profile for McG   Email McG     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Are you going Reg or reserve?
Posts: 113 | From: London | Registered: Jan 2001  |  IP: Logged
tryingtojoin
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posted 18 May 2021 14:01     Profile for tryingtojoin   Email tryingtojoin     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
reg force, hopefully late summer
Posts: 12 | From: richmond | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
McG
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posted 21 May 2021 23:21     Profile for McG   Email McG     Send New Private Message     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Some (and only some) differences you will notice in your training from the resreve description are:

1. You will be living in a building while on course The Engineers use the shacks closest to the Infantry School, while the Infantry use the Shacks closest to CFSME.

2. Your course schedual will more closely resemble a work week. You will work late some nights and through some weekends. It is typically worst at the start of the course and gets better as the staff feel you've reached the standard they desire (This may take longer than you would like, but is necessary).

3. Because your course is longer, you will cover things in more detail and have more hands-on practice than a reservist.

One difference you will not see is the emphasis on fitnesse. It is important through the entire CF, but upperbody strength is emphasised within the Engineers. As Ender mentioned, bridge parts are not light.

Chimo!


Posts: 113 | From: London | Registered: Jan 2001  |  IP: Logged

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