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rceme_rat
Grizzled Old Veteran
Member # 136
Icon 1 posted 16 May 2021 15:51
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Australia's Last Known Gallipoli Veteran Dies at 103:
Member Rated:
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Posts: 222 | From: Toronto, Ontario | Registered: Jan 2001
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Mark Schiller
Old Soldier
Member # 455
Icon 1 posted 21 May 2021 22:13
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If you have never read or seen the story you should take time and watch the movie (of the same name) or read whats available on the internet. This was a massacre of a lot of good soldiers on both sides. In that someone survived it and lived to 103 is a story in itself.

quote:

Vice-Admiral Sir John de Robeck now informed Winston Churchill that he could not capture the Gallipoli peninsula without the help of the army. General Ian Hamilton, commander of the troops on the Greek island of Lemnos, who had watched the failed navy operation, agreed and plans were now made for full-scale landings at Gallipoli.

Leaders of the Greek Army informed Kitchener that he would need 150,000 men to take Gallipoli. Lord Kitchener concluded that only half that number was needed. Kitchener sent the experienced British 29th Division to join the troops from Australia, New Zealand and French colonial troops on Lemnos. Information soon reached the Turkish commander, Liman von Sanders, about the arrival of the 70,000 troops on the island. Sanders knew an attack was imminent and he began positioning his 84,000 troops along the coast where he expected the landings to take place.

The attack that began on the 25th April, 1915 established two beachheads at Helles and Gaba Tepe. Another major landing took place at Sulva Bay on 6th August. However, attempts to sweep across the peninsula ended in failure. By the end of August the Allies had lost over 40,000 men. General Ian Hamilton asked for 95,000 more men, but although supported by Winston Churchill, Kitchener was unwilling to send more troops to the area.

On 14th October, Hamilton was replaced by General Munro. After touring all three fronts Munro recommended withdrawal. Lord Kitchener, who arrived two weeks later, agreed that the 105,000 men should be evacuated. The operation began at Sulva Bay on 7th December. The last of the men left Helles on 9th January, 1916.

About 480,000 Allied troops took part in the Gallipoli campaign. The British had 205,000 casualties (43,000 killed). There were more than 33,600 ANZAC losses (over one-third killed) and 47,000 French casualties (5,000 killed). Turkish casualties are estimated at 250,000 (65,000 killed).

[Canadian]
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Posts: 72 | From: Delta B.C | Registered: Aug 2001
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